Moderators

Certified Moderators List

Moderator Certification Policies Page

Moderator certification cards can be filled out by coaches by other certified moderators and mailed to Alec Krueger. Evaluations can also be submitted online.

In order to become certified, moderators must be rated by coaches of the teams for whom they read, or by other certified moderators. Moderators may request cards from Alec Krueger or download them. On each card, the moderator is rated as to his/her knowledge of rules, pronunciation, speed, and fairness, and is given an overall rating, on a scale of 1 to 3, so the highest possible rating is 15 points.The card must be signed and dated by the evaluator.

Moderators are to give the cards to evaluators before the match begins. The moderators should write their name in the space for the moderator’s name, and may want to put a stamp on the front of the postcard, or ask the coach to turn the card in to the tournament director before leaving for the day. Evaluators should not give the cards directly to the moderators after filling them out. Evaluations may also be submitted online after the match is complete. Coaches and certified moderators are also welcome to evaluate moderators without being asked to by supplying their own cards or by submitting the rating online.

Multiple ratings of a moderator made by affiliates of a given organization/school during a single academic year will be averaged together before the ratings are averaged, so that each organization is weighted equally. Moderators must have 10 or more cards submitted within the last two full academic years, with an average score of at least 12 points, to be certified. Moderators may not evaluate themselves, nor may they be evaluated by anyone affiliated with their current school. Performance certification cards may be submitted based on any matches with both tossups and bonuses or similar structures.

Ratings and comments will be shared anonymously with the moderators they concern.

The IHSSBCA thanks all participants in the moderator certification process, which is designed to help improve the quality of officiating at Illinois events, and to encourage coaches to brush up on the rules.